Biases are more than an inconvenience. Biases can be extremely dangerous. Diversity advocate Vernā Myers examines the subconscious attitudes that can lead to violence. She talks here about how to face your biases and then work to learn more about the groups that we have biases against.

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Media activist Villy Wang started BAYCAT to educate young people from low-income backgrounds to use media to create change. In this talk, Wang talks about how her initiative breaks down biases.

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Fang Ruan, co-lead of the BCG Henderson Institute in China, discusses a shift toward Taoism in Chinese business. Rather than exclusively referring to Confucianism and its focus on authority, Taoist philosophy looks to supporting change rather than controlling it.

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The Social Dilemma Documentary Review Work in Progress with Christopher Michaelson, discusses every working person’s work in progress, namely, our quest to be fully human in a working world that all too often makes us feel like machines, in which we often don’t even have time to think, and that, in the words of Studs…

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Machines Like Me Book Review Work in Progress with Christopher Michaelson discusses every working person’s work in progress, namely, our quest to be fully human in a working world that all too often makes us feel like machines, in which we often don’t even have time to think, and that, in the words of Studs…

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Abramoff’s version of the self-serving bias, which causes us to see things in ways that support our best interests and our pre-existing beliefs.

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Abramoff’s version of role morality, which is our tendency to use different moral standards as we play different “roles” in society.

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Abramoff’s version of rationalizations, which are the excuses we make for not living up to our own, or society’s, ethical standards.

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Abramoff’s version of overconfidence bias, which is our tendency to be more confident about our moral character and our ability to act ethically than is objectively justified.

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Abramoff’s version of moral equilibrium, which describes our tendency to keep a running scoreboard in our heads that compares our self-image as ethical people to our actual behavior.

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